Tagged: Carlos Silva

That’s What He Said- Dustin Pedroia

In my last post, I looked at a quote from Carlos Silva, in which he attributed some of his success to the abnormally high run support he had been receiving.  I thought that was pretty cool, so I’ve decided to do this more often.  I’ll take a quote from a player, reporter, coach, or whoever and try to prove them right or wrong using statistics.  I hereby dub this group of posts “That’s What He Said” (sorry ladies, I promise there will be a “That’s What She Said” when Eri Yoshida makes it).  

And so, I bring you Dustin Pedroia.  If you follow the Red Sox closely then you’ve probably heard this before, but I think enough time has passed since he said it to evaluate appropriately: 

“David’s fine.  He’s one of our teammates.  It could have been me who hit into a double play.  It happens to everybody.  He’s had 60 at-bats.  A couple of years ago I had 60 at-bats and I was hitting .170 and everybody was ready to kill me too.  What happened?  Laser show.” 


This fantastic quote was uttered following this game on May 4th of this year.  The double play that Pedroia is referring to is the one that David Ortiz hit into in the 8th inning.  The Red Sox rallied for 4 runs that inning to win the game in spite of Ortiz, whose double play appeared to cost Boston the game at the time.  As a side note, if you are new to navigating Baseball-Reference’s box scores, if you follow the link above and scroll to the bottom you will find the play-by-play for the entire game.  
As most fans will recall, Ortiz was not the most popular member of the team just 26 days ago.  Pedroia guessed 60 at-bats, which was pretty close.  Here are Ortiz’s 2010 numbers through May 4th (scroll down to the box after the highlighted games).  Ortiz in fact had 67 at-bats, with just 10 hits, 3 home runs, 6 RBI, and a .149 batting average.  As far as Pedroia goes, a couple of years ago would have to mean 2008, right?  But in 2008, Pedroia sported a .311 batting average through 15 games and 61 at-bats en route to winning the AL MVP Award.  Maybe he meant 2009?  Not likely either, as he was hitting .286 through 15 games and 63 at-bats last year.  
Ah, so he must mean 2007, his rookie season.  Now this begins to make sense.  Through 61 at-bats and 22 games in 2007, Pedroia was hitting just .180 with 11 hits and 3 RBI.  What happened???  Pedroia finished the season hitting .317 and went on to become AL Rookie of the Year.  Also, courtesy of tauntr.com, there is significant photographic evidence that Pedroia did actually provide a laser show by the end of the year.

PedroiaLazers2.gif

I’m actually pretty surprised at how accurate Pedroia was with his own numbers here.  Sure, he said “a couple years” instead of “a few” but he was just .010 off of his actual batting average at the start of his rookie season.  But the comparison to 2010 Big Papi?  Not sure if I buy it.  I think it’s a different kind of worrying when your rookie phenom has a rough first month and when your $12.5 mil veteran DH has an even worse first month for the second consecutive season.  There is one area where Pedroia hit the nail on the head though and that is the one that most people care the most about: 2010 David Ortiz has arrived.  Ortiz enters tonight’s action with a .267 average, 10 home runs, and 28 RBI.  Since Pedroia’s quote, that’s .382 with 7 home runs and 22 RBI.  Sounds like a laser show to me.
To recap, Pedroia nailed the rebirth of Ortiz and was remarkably close on the numbers he cited as well, although I’m not sure if I buy the comparison between his 2007 season and Ortiz’s 2010.  But I’m not going to complain while Ortiz continues to hit the ball like he used to in the good old days.  
I’ve taken a few different angles now on this blog, whether it be looking at a current event’s historical significance, looking at some historical events, or this new quote idea.  Some of the other ideas I’ve had for posts are some introduction to newer statistics (such as WAR, GameScore, or UZR), some more BU baseball history, or some game previews or recaps.  Of course I don’t have time to write all of this at once, so if you feel strongly about any of these or there’s anything else you’d like me to write about then by all means let me know and I would be thrilled to do that first.  
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A Few Thoughts- Lima, Halladay, Silva

This will be kind of a miscellaneous entry since I don’t have a lot of time to do a bunch of research on one topic.  I know it’s been a while since I last posted, but I’ve been busy with my first full week of work and I’ve also started a project related to this blog that hopefully I’ll be able to reveal before too long.  Without further ado…

Keep former Major Leaguer Jose Lima‘s friends and family in your thoughts as he unexpectedly died today from a heart attack at the age of 37.  I best remember him as a member of the Houston Astros, though he also spent time with the Tigers, Royals, Dodgers, and Mets.  His best season came with Houston in 1999 when he was an all-star and finished 4th in Cy Young voting with a 21-10 record and a 3.58 ERA.  He also posted a career high 187 K’s that year.  His most similar players (See here if you don’t know what I mean by this) are Brian Moehler, Eric Milton, and Sidney Ponson.  

The Red Sox Know How to Beat Roy Halladay

The Sox beat Halladay again today, and prove to be the toughest team against him.  Here are his career splits by opponent sorted by most losses (today’s is not included).

I Split W L ▾ W-L% ERA G CG SHO IP H ER HR BB SO WHIP
Boston Red Sox 14 14 .500 4.28 41 6 1 269.1 280 128 29 64 200 1.277
Tampa Bay Rays 12 11 .522 3.67 34 4 0 225.2 236 92 19 47 170 1.254
Texas Rangers 7 7 .500 5.36 20 4 0 124.1 144 74 13 32 98 1.416
New York Yankees 18 6 .750 2.84 37 7 3 247.1 221 78 23 54 190 1.112
Seattle Mariners 6 5 .545 2.51 15 4 3 97.0 92 27 5 19 63 1.144
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 8 5 .615 4.32 16 4 0 108.1 118 52 8 19 83 1.265
Oakland Athletics 6 4 .600 4.54 13 0 0 83.1 92 42 7 35 65 1.524
Chicago White Sox 5 4 .556 3.28 15 2 0 90.2 87 33 7 26 72 1.246
Baltimore Orioles 20 4 .833 2.89 31 1 0 193.0 189 62 16 39 111 1.181
Kansas City Royals 9 3 .750 2.65 14 4 1 102.0 87 30 10 21 61 1.059
San Francisco Giants 0 2 .000 7.23 3 0 0 18.2 25 15 2 5 14 1.607
New York Mets 3 2 .600 4.05 5 1 1 33.1 37 15 4 8 21 1.350
Detroit Tigers 12 2 .857 2.19 16 6 4 119.0 99 29 10 10 73 0.916
Cleveland Indians 6 2 .750 3.52 13 2 1 79.1 72 31 2 33 74 1.324
Chicago Cubs 0 2 .000 3.00 2 0 0 12.0 14 4 1 1 10 1.250
Washington Nationals 6 1 .857 2.43 10 0 0 66.2 56 18 6 10 53 0.990
Pittsburgh Pirates 1 1 .500 1.13 3 1 0 24.0 23 3 0 4 22 1.125
Minnesota Twins 8 1 .889 2.90 13 2 1 87.0 74 28 5 12 70 0.989
Milwaukee Brewers 0 1 .000 6.00 1 0 0 6.0 7 4 1 0 8 1.167
Florida Marlins 1 1 .500 3.71 3 0 0 17.0 21 7 1 2 11 1.353
St. Louis Cardinals 2 0 1.000 1.13 2 1 0 16.0 12 2 1 3 14 0.938
Philadelphia Phillies 0 0 2.45 2 0 0 3.2 2 1 0 1 3 0.818
Los Angeles Dodgers 3 0 1.000 1.50 3 1 0 24.0 15 4 1 6 13 0.875
Houston Astros 1 0 1.000 0.00 1 1 0 9.0 7 0 0 0 8 0.778
Colorado Rockies 1 0 1.000 1.17 2 1 1 15.1 12 2 0 2 8 0.913
Cincinnati Reds 1 0 1.000 3.68 2 0 0 14.2 17 6 2 6 14 1.568
Atlanta Braves 2 0 1.000 0.46 3 1 1 19.2 12 1 1 3 15 0.763
Arizona Diamondbacks 2 0 1.000 3.86 2 0 0 11.2 11 5 0 3 9 1.200
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/24/2010.
Carlos Silva is Really Good…?
Carlos Silva has baffled me and opposing hitters thus far, recording his 6th win tonight to improve to 6-0.  He becomes the first Cubs starter to do so since Ken Holtzman in 1967.  When interviewed after the game, Silva said, “It’s because they’ve been scoring a lot of runs…The whole rotation has been really good, but I’ve been getting more run support than anybody else.”  Of course I had to investigate.  Silva, after tonight, has received 6.67 runs of support per start.  The other Cubs starters rank as follows: 
Maybe Silva is on to something!  But there’s no denying that his 3.55 ERA is far and away better than his career mark of 4.66 and his 2009 mark of 8.60.